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Table 1 Examples of issues with an interactionalist approach in the context of computer-mediated language assessment

From: Construct and content in context: implications for language learning, teaching and assessment in China

  Task design and test taker performance Rating and score reporting
Writing assessment ▪ Shall we provide test takers with auto spelling check, autocorrection, and online dictionaries when they write on the computer? ▪ How do we score test takers’ performance on computer-based writing with the help of auto spelling, autocorrection, and online dictionaries? How should scores of such an assessment be interpreted and reported?
▪ What cognitive processes are test takers expected to be engaged in when writing on the computer? ▪ How should test takers’ strategic competence in a computer-based writing assessment be rated, interpreted and reported?
Speaking assessment ▪ How should test takers be paired or grouped in a computer-based pair or group discussion task? ▪ How do we score test takers who co-construct a discourse in non-face-to-face computer-mediated discussion? How should scores of such a computer-based pair discussion be interpreted and reported?
▪ What communication strategies are expected to be used by test takers when they perform non-face-to-face computer-mediated pair or group tasks? ▪ How should test takers’ strategic competence in a computer-based speaking assessment be rated, interpreted and reported?